Blog Archives

How Trust Works

Trust is perhaps one of the most, if not the most, valuable thing in our society.  Much of our societal functions depend on trust.  In The Count of Monte Cristo, the Count opens up an account with Danglars, and because he is rich, Danglars trusts him and as a result Danglars opens up an account with him, which eventually leads to his downfall.

Here are a few links on how the brain trusts:

http://brainwaves.corante.com/archives/2003/08/11/the_neurobiology_of_trust.php

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/your-neurochemical-self/201401/hook-ups-oxytocin-and-the-brain-s-quest-trust

http://mentalfloss.com/article/54556/what-makes-our-brains-feel-trust

http://news.sciencemag.org/2005/03/building-trust-brain

Advertisements

The Curious Case of the Giggles.

Laughter.

This sudden feeling of joy is inexplicable and goes as soon as it comes.  Often times people laugh and do not know the reason for the laughter.

Why do we laugh?

Laughter is a social tool used to strengthen relationships and comedy is often used to lighten up a mood in bad scenarios.  It is an experience that can not be enjoyed alone, but has to be shared.  Here are a few links describing why this happens.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/laughter1.htm

http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200011/the-science-laughter

Ted talk describing how comedy is used to communicate:

 

“Don’t judge a book by its cover.”

This phrase is often meant to be a metaphor, however for this post I will assume it has literal meaning.  Judging books by their cover is involuntary.  It is how our brains determine good books from bad ones.  In this competitive economic system, every book competes for the best cover simply because it attracts more consumers and there are many other choices for consumers.  Why does it attract more consumers if the advice that’s always given is to NOT judge a book by its cover?  Images are comprehended faster and easier by the brain than text.  The cover is meant to grab our attention easily and effectively and give an idea of what the book is about.  For example, many copies of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities have a cover that indicates very easily that it is about the French Revolution.  This helps alleviate some of the decision making to pick up a book, as we live in a time full of choice.

Barry Schwartz explains how too much choice influences our state of contentment and how it is better to have less choice.  Our brains need book covers to narrow down the options.  In order for their book to be read, one must put work into a good cover.  People can be viewed through a very similar perspective.

Ted Talk by Chip Kidd on designing book covers:

%d bloggers like this: